DCIC and Anorak.

We had a tremendous reception for Michael Winger’s, “I cure myself…”  We had a good number of people passionate about supporting a strong gathering of creativity.  To celebrate, we were pleased to present 2 fascinating groups, the DCIC and Anorak.  Find details about the bands can be found here.  DCIC and Anorak both explored the limits and boundaries of creativity and improvisation in the moment.  We thought the music was a fantastic addition to the artist’s reception.  Patrons came to view the work, then stayed to enjoy the sounds gushing out of the studio.

Here’s a breif video of Anorak in the space.

Paint Cans.

We’ve seen artists work with process related materials, but that was nothing in comparison to this.  Recently I visited Steven Dobbin’s studio to view his new work, and I was impressed.

If you happened to visit the Zip Code show in our pop up gallery in Arlington, VA, then you’ve seen the predecessor of this work.  He has a show that recently opened in New York.  Yes. Yes.  All tremendous area artists end up there, but with out rambling on too much where the good artists are, let’s take a second to look.  

Steven takes an icon, and obsesses about it.  Seriously.  We’re not talking about a few cans stacked against a wall.  We’re talking about volume, and that means work.   He preps the cans, which includes proper disposal of the paint, and the instigation of the deterioration of the cans with both chemical and natural means.  Yes, yes, oxidation in nature is chemistry, but let’s move beyond that,  his yard has been full of containers filled with paint and cat littler to aid the drying of left over paint.  Think of the 100s of gallons of dried paint which receive proper disposal!   It’s also important to note that these are all essentially recycled, from paint left overs that were either found or donated to the project. 

I’m constantly in awe of what he does with diligence and perfection,  which is followed by obsession.  One work isn’t enough.  He continues the idea until it’s done, and this time we’re talking well over 850 cans in our friend’s gallery in NY.  Steven has often told me that he wished he could stop, but he can’t.  He’s compelled to move forward.

View his  current installation entitled “Reclamation” at Causey Contemporary below.  We are so lucky to get to see his process of installation here.

View the show here, check out the images of rust and pigment on a panel.  Well worth the visit!

Press for Jazz

The gurus at the express night out have picked up the details about our Fringe Jazz show with Anorak and the DCIC.  We’re really pleased to see this in the express.  Find the note about the show here.  Find the complete release about this show here.

“I cure myself…”

Michael Winger

“I cure myself…” is an exhibition developed by Michael Winger, a man, and an artist on a pathway to find solace in world where the medical system leaves you asking questions with an unsure fate for one’s health and well being. He’s been on a journey to cure his own bouts with Cancer. Through this process he’s developed art based on natural products, and the process is as important as the final out come of the objects.

On November 8th, a group of artists including Lauren Pond, Grayson Heck, and Jesse Cohen met at the Gallery to aid Michael in developing a one-o-a-kind gallery installation.

icuremyself

This work is an example great spiritual enlightenment.

We’ll have a limited supply of extra materials for you to build your own nest.

We would be honored to have you view this work before our Fringe Jazz Concert the same night. Details on the music can be found here.

Visit the, “I cure myself…” facebook event invite here.

Here’s a video of the installation:

Before developing this exhibition we wanted to get a better handle on Installation art, so we turned to the net, and read this link.   Specifically, they write, “Installation art describes an artistic genre of site-specific, three-dimensional works designed to transform the perception of a space.”  The end of that line is important, …designed to transform the perception of a space.  That’s what the installation at “I cure myself…” does.  You walk in, and there’s a perception of energy, peace, and tranquility.

Becoming Animal

Yesterday, I stopped by the Art League  at the Torpedo Factory to Jury a new show entitled Becoming Animal. The show runs from November 4 to December 7, 2009.  Artists were asked to explore the animal within us all or submit images of animals real or imaginary including everything from  our favorite pets to endangered and/or extinct species.  Artists are also encouraged to explore the fine line between humans and animals.  It was my goal to develop a selection of works that did exactly that.  It was important for me to attempt to move beyond the average pet picture and find raw emotion with in a tremendous pool of work.

There were well over 450 submissions which made this a tough yet pleasurable task.   The Art League is an organized movement which could give Seiko or even a Rolex a run for the money.   I was amazed at the attention.  There were 5 or 6 volunteers dedicated to helping the process run smoothly.  They insisted on bringing the work to me to view it.  I felt guilty watching them run from one pile to the next bringing me art.  In the end, I was exhausted, yet they had to feel it more since they were constantly running back and forth!  

The most difficult task was saying no, over 35o times, such an un-Dale Carnegie task.  (I keep hearing his instructions, make them say yes!)  

The Art League’s marketing manager too notes on our discussion about the curatorial process, and what I looked for to include a work.  At which point, I had to say, there could have been 2 or 3 other shows in this body of work.

One image or painting wasn’t  better than another,  the chosen works seemed to fit the theme better.  Some were picked for their raw emotion, others for my opinion of great skill, and many things in-between.  I would have loved to come back for a later visit to think more about which images were chosen, however the spontaneity of the of the process is part of the excitement, and it ads to the show.  I like the outcome. 

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Fringe Jazz

 

Thanksgiving is coming up, and then it’s the holidays and everybody’s got tons of stuff to do and no time and all that. Luckily we’re not there just yet. Seriously. We are not there yet.
Ok, yeah the clocks fell back and now it gets dark at five pm and boo hoo. But wait a second. Winter hasn’t taken over yet. We are not there yet.
I have an idea. Let’s celebrate the last days of autumn, and do it up right. Before the shopping and stress and seasonal disorder and slush and don’t wake me until it’s spring. I’ve got a great idea: let’s get together at a cool, fun, out-of-the-way kinda place and hang out for an evening. Even better, let’s get some cool live music, too!
Lucky lucky us. It just so happens that we’ve got a cool place, and a great lineup for a fun night:
Anorak, a hard-to-classify trio of European improvisers (ok, one of them is from Baltimore, but she was living in Amsterdam and met the other two) will be in town. The DC Improvisers Collective (DCIC) will play too.
Anorak is a cellist, a pianist, and a drummer. They are doing neat stuff. You will probably like it. DCIC has a special lineup that night, featuring Vattel Cherry on bass and Ed Ricart on guitar, plus their regular trio of sax, guitar, drums. The music will be hot.
Show is at the ArtDC Gallery / Lustine Center in the Hyattsville Arts District. Hyattsville is a happening little place – just up the road from DC (really, not far) and just down the road from College Park.
Blurbage about the bands below. Show is pay-what-you-like so don’t worry about the money. Just think about the fun we’re gonna have.
When: Saturday, November 21.
Doors at 7:30pm, music promptly at 8:00pm.
Where: ArtDC / Lustine Center
5710 Baltimore Avenue
Hyattsville, MD 20781
http://artdc.com/art-space/
Anorak:
American/European ensemble Anorak unifies musical and cultural backgrounds in an exploration of texture and sound-worlds unique to its piano/drums/cello instrumentation. Anorak’s work is informed by the jazz, contemporary, and classical vocabulary, but inspired by foregoing stylistic practice in exchange for open, impulsive, and raw exposition of sound and energy.
http://www.myspace.com/anorakmusicband
DC Improvisers Collective:
The DC Improvisers Collective (DCIC) is a trio exploring the intersection of jazz, contemporary composition and rock music. Their current lineup features Ben Azzara (drums), Jonathan Matis (guitar), and Mike Sebastian (reeds). These musicians come together from diverse backgrounds, bringing experience from performing in rock bands and jazz groups, as well as post-classical composition. Drawing on the visceral energy and immediacy of rock music, along with the spontaneous creativity and subtlety of the jazz tradition, DCIC is able to forge new music that possesses both great intensity and mindful nuance.
http://dcic.alkem.org
Check out their new record, a live album featuring Greg Osby:

http://dcic.bandcamp.com/

Anorak

Thanksgiving is coming up, and then it’s the holidays and everybody’s got tons of stuff to do and no time and all that. Luckily we’re not there just yet. Seriously. We are not there yet.

Ok, yeah the clocks fell back and now it gets dark at five pm and boo hoo. But wait a second. Winter hasn’t taken over yet. We are not there yet.

I have an idea. Let’s celebrate the last days of autumn, and do it up right. Before the shopping and stress and seasonal disorder and slush and don’t wake me until it’s spring. I’ve got a great idea: let’s get together at a cool, fun, out-of-the-way kinda place and hang out for an evening. Even better, let’s get some cool live music, too!

Lucky lucky us. It just so happens that we’ve got a cool place, and a great lineup for a fun night:

Anorak, a hard-to-classify trio of European improvisers (ok, one of them is from Baltimore, but she was living in Amsterdam and met the other two) will be in town. The DC Improvisers Collective (DCIC) will play too.

Anorak is a cellist, a pianist, and a drummer. They are doing neat stuff. You will probably like it. DCIC has a special lineup that night, featuring Vattel Cherry on bass and Ed Ricart on guitar, plus their regular trio of sax, guitar, drums. The music will be hot.

Continue reading

Art Festival

Our neighbors the design studio next door to our space have worked hard to bring PG county an amazing opportunity.  We’ve all been brain storming about how to bring greater attention to the area’s art scene, and they’ve found the key.  They’ve spent serous time developing a solution, an arts district art festival called, “The Market Place!”  The Design studio folks must be morning people since they opened on October 31st at 9am, we didn’t make it out till noon, but we were very excited to share the traffic.  

On the way over to the gallery to open for The Market Place, we ran across this billboard off of route one.  We thought to ourselves… no..  that’s not right.  We guess many adults would disagree, but then again, we’re living our future now.  Kids have a lot to wait for!  Maybe they should add a disclaimer, since it’s been said that billboards like this can end marriages.  
Sex Can't Wait

Any how, we digress.  Here’s a shot of The Market Place.  Kudos to the Design Studio for investing in matching Tents!  It looks simply amazing!  There was only a second to take a shot, there were so many things going on that afternoon we didn’t have an opportunity to snap another shot.  We heard the coffee there was amazing, and we look forward to an increased art presence!  More to come!

The Market Place

Closing Reception.

We had a very positive time at the closing reception for Sculpture: 301.  We has the opportunity to meet a large portion of the UMD art grad students.  It was a warm crowd and they seemed excited about the show and our desire to collaborate.  To us, there’s nothing like sharing tremendous art with the public, and this show certain gave us that opportunity.   We send our thanks to Steven Jones for his curatorial energy! 

Here are a few snapshots of the reception:
In the gallery at Sculpture: 301

In front of the artdc Gallery at Sculpture: 301

Artists and art lovers in front of the gallery at Sculpture: 301